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  • Using radio to save lives in Ethiopia.

    Gonderit is one of three radio listening group facilitators in Kosseye village high in the mountains in northern Ethiopia. She received training and materials from Save the Children to help her lead the weekly women’s listening group.

     

    Three groups huddle around small, battery-powered radios. It’s a misty morning in the mountains of Ethiopia. Bisrat fills the air. Airing every Sunday morning for 24 weeks, Bisrat is an educational radio program that’s run by the Ethiopian government and Save the Children.

     

    Providing entertaining educational material on child and maternal health issues for the entire region, it includes topics such as how to prepare for pregnancy, the dangers of child marriage and child trafficking.

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    Ethiopia, 2014

    Save the Children Australia

    Nikon D800
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/160s at f/8

  • Using radio to save lives in Ethiopia.

    Muluken, 18 years old, is the facilitator for the youth listening group in Kosseye. He leads the discussions after the broadcast of the Bisrat radio programme.

    “We learn that a child should not be married before the age of 18. The training also covers the health problems that come from child marriage.”

     

    Providing entertaining educational material on child and maternal health issues for the entire region, Bisrat includes topics such as how to prepare for pregnancy, the dangers of child marriage and child trafficking.

     

    “I have seen big changes in the community,” Muluken says. “Children who are trained here educate their parents.”

     

    Save the Children supports 63 radio listening groups in North Gonder, with a female, male and youth group at each site, directly reaching more than 1,300 participants and indirectly reaching more than 70,000 community members.

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    Ethiopia, 2014

    Save the Children Australia

    Nikon D800
    Nikkor 50mm lens,
    1/160s at f/8

  • Using radio to save lives in Ethiopia.

    15-year-old Tadila managed to convince her parents to cancel her arranged marriage because of the health risks.

     

    “I heard about the impact of child marriage on the radio,” she says.

     

    Tadila is a keen listener to the educational radio programme Bisrat, broadcast every Sunday morning.

     

    Before she joined the radio listening group in her home village Kosseye in northern Ethiopia her parents had arranged for her to be married.

     

    “I had no idea about the impact of child marriage,” Tadila says. “But when I listened to the programme I understood the consequences for my life and that it had no benefits.”

     

    Tadila told her parents what she learned and that she wanted to study. Her parents reconsidered their decision.

     

    Girls who marry young and have children before their own bodies are fully developed run a high risk of a series of health problems. Information about the health aspect of early marriage has been one of the themes for the radio project supported by Save the Children.

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    Ethiopia, 2014

    Save the Children Australia

    Nikon D800
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/125s at f/5.6

  • Using radio to save lives in Ethiopia.

    Berhanu, 48 years old, in the control room at Gonder Education Media Centre.

     

    Every Sunday for 24 weeks the educational programme Bisrat is broadcast from here. The equipment is old but functional. The programme educates rural communities about child and maternal health issues.

     

    “We have a strong attachment with our listeners,” says Gazahegne, one of the radio presenters. “They write us letters. They share their problems and we respond on the radio program.”

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    Ethiopia, 2014

    Save the Children Australia

    Nikon D800
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/40s at f/2.8