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  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Rakib* talking to Himel* under a flyover in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. Both boys are 11 years old and work on the streets.

     

    Rakib came to Dhaka with his mother and four siblings two months ago. They came to the big city to try to find work. Back in his home village Rakib went to school, but in Dhaka he can’t. His mother has found work as a cook in a hostel, but the salary is not enough, so Rakib begs on the streets trying to make ends meet.

     

    A social worker talked to Rakib and suggested that he come to the centre. Rakib hesitated at first but agreed and now comes regularly.

     

    “I’m happy to have found new friends here and I love that I can draw and play board games,” Rakib says. “But spending time with my mother is what I like most of all.”

     

    The centre Rakib is going to is one of five run by Save the Children’s partner organisation INCIDIN Bangladesh. They are funded by the IKEA Foundation, thanks to the Let’s Play for Change campaign. These Multiple Activity centres were set up close to the railway and bus stations where many of the most vulnerable children live and work.

     

    Children are given the opportunity to play and to catch up on their education; and they have a safe place to stay during the day. Staff try to refer children to other services and connect them to schools and night shelters. Around 100 children come to each centre, although most don’t come every day.

     

    *Names have been changed.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/250s at f/4

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Rakib*, 11 years old, came to Dhaka with his mother and four siblings two months ago. They came to the big city to try to find work.

     

    Back in his home village Rakib went to school, but in Dhaka he can’t. His mother has found work as a cook in a hostel, but the salary is not enough, so Rakib begs on the streets trying to make ends meet.

     

    A social worker talked to Rakib and suggested that he come to the centre. Rakib hesitated at first but agreed and now comes regularly.

     

    “I’m happy to have found new friends here and I love that I can draw and play board games,” Rakib says. “But spending time with my mother is what I like most of all.”

     

    The centre Rakib is going to is one of five run by Save the Children’s partner organisation INCIDIN Bangladesh. They are funded by the IKEA Foundation, thanks to the Let’s Play for Change campaign. These Multiple Activity centres were set up close to the railway and bus stations where many of the most vulnerable children live and work.

     

    Children are given the opportunity to play and to catch up on their education; and they have a safe place to stay during the day. Staff try to refer children to other services and connect them to schools and night shelters. Around 100 children come to each centre, although most don’t come every day.

     

    *Name has been changed.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 70-200mm lens 1/320 at f4 and Nikkor 24-70mm lens 1/400 at f/4

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Rasel*, eleven years old, is out on the streets every morning, selling newspapers. He is eleven years old and spends his time around one of the big bus stations in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh.

     

    Rasel was beaten by his teachers in his home village so he ran away and ended up in Dhaka.

     

    “I didn’t know where to stay, what to eat or where to go, so I stayed under the flyover at night.” Rasel says. “But after a few days I met a boy who said there was a centre nearby and that I could go there and wash myself, play and meet others.”

     

    The centre Rasel is going to is one of five funded by the IKEA Foundation, thanks to the Let’s Play for Change campaign. These Multiple Activity centres were set up close to the railway and bus stations where many of the most vulnerable children live and work.

     

    Children are given the opportunity to play and to catch up on their education; and they have a safe place to stay during the day. Staff try to refer children to other services and connect them to schools and night shelters. Around 100 children come to each centre, although most don’t come every day.

     

    For many children, migration promises the chance of a better life and an opportunity to find work and education. However, once children move, they become highly vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, both during their journey and at their destination.

     

    Save the Children is also addressing the underlying causes, raising awareness in rural communities about the dangers of child migration.

     

    *Name has been changed.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/640s at f/4

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Shohag*, 11 years old, came to Dhaka with his mother, but she left him on his own when she returned to their village.

     

    Shohag lives on the streets and sleeps under the flyover close to one of the big bus stations.

     

    Shohag works as a helper on local transport and begs in the street. He has found new friends at the centre run by Save the Children’s partner organisation INCIDIN Bangladesh, and loves to play with blocks and colouring books.

     

    “I’ve learnt to write my name at the centre, and the Bangla alphabet,” Shohag says.

     

    The centre Shohag is going to is one of five funded by the IKEA Foundation, thanks to the Let’s Play for Change campaign. These Multiple Activity centres were set up close to the railway and bus stations where many of the most vulnerable children live and work.

     

    Children are given the opportunity to play and to catch up on their education; and they have a safe place to stay during the day. Staff try to refer children to other services and connect them to schools and night shelters. Around 100 children come to each centre, although most don’t come every day.

     

    *Name has been changed.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 70-200mm lens,
    1/250s at f/2.8

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Boys resting at a centre for street children close to one of the large bus stations in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh.

     

    There are thousands of children on the move in Bangladesh today, some come with their families to big cities, some migrate alone.

     

    This centre is one of five run by Save the Children’s partner organisation INCIDIN Bangladesh. The centres are funded by the IKEA Foundation, thanks to the Let’s Play for Change campaign. These Multiple Activity centres were set up close to the railway and bus stations where many of the most vulnerable children live and work.

     

    Children are given the opportunity to play and to catch up on their education, and they have a safe place to stay during the day. Staff try to refer children to other services and connect them to schools and night shelters. Around 100 children come to each centre, although most don’t come every day.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/80s at f/2.8

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Faruk* 12 years old, playing Carrom with other boys at one of the five centres for street children in Dhaka, run by Save the Children’s partner organisation INCIDIN Bangladesh.

     

    There are thousands of children on the move in Bangladesh today, some come with their families to big cities, some migrate alone.

     

    The centres are funded by the IKEA Foundation, thanks to the Let’s Play for Change campaign. These Multiple Activity centres were set up close to the railway and bus stations where many of the most vulnerable children live and work.

     

    Children are given the opportunity to play and to catch up on their education, and they have a safe place to stay and rest during the day. Staff try to refer children to other services and connect them to schools and night shelters. Around 100 children come to each centre, although most don’t come every day.

     

    *Name has been changed.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/60s at f/2.8

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Hashi, 12 years old, is playing basketball at the Socialisation Centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in Rajshahi in north-western Bangladesh.

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    Many families in Hashi’s community have moved there from the country side, looking for work. It is a poor and crowded neighbourhood close to the river and border with India.

     

    For many children, migration promises the chance of a better life and an opportunity to find work and education. However, once children move, they become highly vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, both during their journey and at their destination.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration, raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/200s at f/4

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Nitu, 13 years old, serving at a mixed volleyball game near a Socialisation Centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in Rajshahi in north-western Bangladesh.

     

    “I’m surprised to find that I have great volleyball skills and I’m very happy about it,” Nitu says. “It has become my favourite sport. My parents wouldn’t let me go outside to play, but here at the centre I can, and I love it.”

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    Many families in the community have moved there from the country side, looking for work. It is a poor and crowded neighbourhood close to the river and border with India.

     

    For many children, migration promises the chance of a better life and an opportunity to find work and education. However, once children move, they become highly vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, both during their journey and at their destination.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration, raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/400s at f/8

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Sheuli is 14 years old and came to Rajshahi two months ago with her father, mother and brother.

     

    Sheuli comes to the Socialisation Centre twice a day, before and after school. Apart from playing here, she’s been given educational support. The things that Sheuli finds difficult in school she will ask the volunteers at the centre about.

     

    “I’m very grateful for the centre,” Sheuli says. “My friends and I gather here and go outside to play. This wasn’t possible for us girls before. Now the community here can see us playing together. Before, it was impossible for girls and boys of my age to play together. It’s in our culture. This change is very good. There’s no inequality when we play together.”

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration, raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 70-200mm lens,
    1/400s at f/4

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Hashi, 12 years old, comes regularly to the Socialisation Centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in Rajshahi in north-western Bangladesh.

     

    Many families in Hashi’s community have moved there from the country side, looking for work. It is a poor and crowded neighbourhood close to the river and border with India. Many children, like Hashi, are extra vulnerable.

     

    She lives with her grandmother while her mother is away working. But conditions are poor and her grandmother works long hours.

     

    Most of the time I was collecting wood from the sand bar in the river and playing and not going home,” Hashi says. “That’s why my grandmother was anxious for me. We had some cases of trafficking, she was worried that I’d be trafficked.”

     

    Volunteers from Save the Children, working to prevent unsafe migration in communities like the one Hashi lives in, met Hashi and suggested she’d come to the newly opened socialisation centre close to her home.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration, raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 105mm lens,
    1/800s at f/2

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Aseya and Toma playing Gollachut – ‘round and round’ – with their friends at a Socialisation Centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in a rural area outside Rajshahi in north-western Bangladesh.

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    Many families in poor communities are considering migrating to the cities due to poverty. For many adults and children, migration promises the chance of a better life and an opportunity to find work and education. However, once children move – especially on their own – they become highly vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, both during their journey and at their destination.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, like this one, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration by raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/80s at f/8

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Sitara, Aseya and Rima playing Bouchuri – ‘wife-theft’ – with their friends at a Socialisation Centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in a rural area outside Rajshahi in north-western Bangladesh.

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    Many families in poor communities are considering migrating to the cities due to poverty. For many adults and children, migration promises the chance of a better life and an opportunity to find work and education. However, once children move – especially on their own – they become highly vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, both during their journey and at their destination.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, like this one, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration by raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/500s at f/8

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Rotna playing Bouchuri – ‘wife-theft’ – with her friends at a Socialisation Centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in a rural area outside Rajshahi in north-western Bangladesh.

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    Many families in poor communities are considering migrating to the cities due to poverty. For many adults and children, migration promises the chance of a better life and an opportunity to find work and education. However, once children move – especially on their own – they become highly vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, both during their journey and at their destination.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, like this one, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration by raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/400s and 1/1000s at f/8

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Surovi skipping at a Socialisation Centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in a rural area outside Rajshahi in north-western Bangladesh.

     

    The centre offers girls a chance to play together even as they get older, something they would otherwise not be allowed or find impossible.

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    Many families in poor communities are considering migrating to the cities due to poverty. For many adults and children, migration promises the chance of a better life and an opportunity to find work and education. However, once children move – especially on their own – they become highly vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, both during their journey and at their destination.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, like this one, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration by raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 70-200mm lens,
    1/200s at f/8

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Riya (left) and Samena (right) skipping at a Socialisation Centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in a rural area outside Rajshahi in north-western Bangladesh.

     

    The centre offers girls a chance to play together even as they get older, something they would otherwise not be allowed or find impossible.

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    Many families in poor communities are considering migrating to the cities due to poverty. For many adults and children, migration promises the chance of a better life and an opportunity to find work and education. However, once children move – especially on their own – they become highly vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, both during their journey and at their destination.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, like this one, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration by raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 70-200mm lens,
    1/100s and 1/200s at f/8

  • Children on the move – Ethiopia.

    Monira* is trying to catch Sumona* during a game of Dariabanda at a Socialisation Centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in a minority community in rural north-western Bangladesh.

     

    The centre offers girls a chance to play together even as they get older, something they would otherwise not be allowed or find impossible.

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    Many families in poor communities are considering migrating to the cities due to poverty. For many adults and children, migration promises the chance of a better life and an opportunity to find work and education. However, once children move – especially on their own – they become highly vulnerable to discrimination, violence, abuse and exploitation, both during their journey and at their destination.

     

    At the Socialisation Centres, like this one, children are given the opportunity to play and learn. They also have a safe place to stay during the day. Save the Children is addressing the underlying causes behind unsafe migration by raising awareness in the community about the dangers of child migration.

     

    *Names have been changed.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 70-200mm lens,
    1/250s at f/4.5

  • Children on the move – Bangladesh.

    Ranajit*, 14 years old, went to Dhaka with his sister’s husband to work in construction. But the job was much harder than promised, he never saw much of the salary and living conditions were very poor.

     

    “I felt lonely. I worked hard, but couldn’t sleep.,” Ranajit says. “I didn’t have any friends. The others didn’t know my language and I felt like a stranger.”

     

    “At home, I used to play football. In Dhaka, I saw other children playing, but I had no time off to play. But in my mind, I thought that if I could join them, I would feel good.”

     

    Instead of returning home with nice clothes and enough money to help his family and pay for school, Ranajit escaped with some other boys and came back empty handed and ill.

     

    Children from the socialisation centre in his village helped him to contact volunteers who helped him, and other children who had been in similar situations.

     

    “I come to the centre a few times a week. I love the cartoon books and the building blocks.”

     

    The centre is one of 32 set up by Save the Children in two different areas of Bangladesh where children are particularly vulnerable to unsafe migration. The centres are part of a project supported by the IKEA Foundation, as part of the Let’s Play for Change campaign.

     

    “If any of my friends ask if going to Dhaka is a good idea, I say no,” Ranajit says. “The air is bad, you might suffer from disease like I did. I had jaundice. If you go, don’t go alone. If your father and mother are going – then you can go too. But don’t go alone.”

     

    *Name has been changed.

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    Nikon D5
    Nikkor 24-70mm lens,
    1/80s at f/2.8