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  • Hashi was at risk of trafficking.

    “I love volleyball, most of all. Basketball and chess,” Hashi says.

     

    She comes regularly to the socialisation centre run by Save the Children’s partner ACD, in Rajshahi in North-Western Bangladesh.

     

    Many families in Hashi’s community have moved there from the country side, looking for work. It is a poor and crowded neighbourhood close to the river and border with India. Many children, like Hashi, are extra vulnerable.

     

    Volunteers from Save the Children, working to prevent unsafe migration in communities like the one Hashi lives in, met Hashi and suggested she’d come to the newly opened socialisation centre close to her home. The centre offers a safe place to stay, play, meet friends and help with education.

     

     

    Learn more about the Save the Children programme: savethechildren.net/i-play-i-learn-and-im-safe

     

    Learn more about the IKEA Foundation campaign: ikeafoundation.org/campaigns/

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    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    2.16 video
    Filmed in Rajshahi.

  • Alone on the streets of Dhaka.

    Rasel is 11 years old. He came to Dhaka – the capital of Bangladesh – on his own, a month ago. He was studying in a religious boarding school. He was beaten by his teachers and ran away.

     

    “I didn’t know where to stay, what to eat, where to go,” Rasel says.

     

    Through another boy living on the street Rasel got in contact with one of the five centres for street children run by Save the Children’s partner organisation INCIDIN Bangladesh. They are funded by the IKEA Foundation, thanks to the Let’s Play for Change campaign. The centres are set up close to the railway station, and bus stops, where many of the most vulnerable children live and work.

     

    Here, children are given the opportunity to play, to catch up on their education and they have a safe place to stay during the day. Staff work to refer children to other services and connect them to schools and night shelters. Around 100 children come to each centre, but most of them don’t come every day.

     

     

    Learn more about the Save the Children programme: savethechildren.net/i-play-i-learn-and-im-safe

     

    Learn more about the IKEA Foundation campaign: ikeafoundation.org/campaigns/

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    2:41 video
    Filmed in Dhaka.

  • Shanta planned to go to Dhaka by herself.

    “I knew my grandmother could not afford to have me at home,” says Shanta 12 years old from north eastern Bangladesh. “So, I wanted to go away.”

     

    “I planned to go to Dhaka, to get a job and money so I could continue studying.”

     

    Like many children in poor communities in the country side in Bangladesh, Shanta was hoping for a better life in the big city. She knew nothing of the risks involved in going to the capital Dhaka.

     

    “I didn’t know anything about Dhaka, how it is, how people are or where to live,” Shanta says.

     

    But before she left, volunteers from Save the Children, working to prevent unsafe migration in communities like the one Shanta lives in, met her and her grandmother and suggested she’d come to the newly opened socialisation centre close to her home. The centre offers a safe place to stay, play, meet friends and help with education.

     

     

    Learn more about the Save the Children programme: savethechildren.net/i-play-i-learn-and-im-safe

     

    Learn more about the IKEA Foundation campaign: ikeafoundation.org/campaigns/

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    1:09 video
    Filmed in Godagari.

  • Interview with Mark Pierce.

    Migration makes children vulnerable to child labour, abuse and sexual exploitation. Mark Pierce, Save the Children’s country director in Bangladesh, explains.

     

    The ‘I play, I learn and I’m safe’ project is an opportunity for Save the Children to test approaches and strategies to combat the situation in terms of children on the move.

     

    An important part of the project is to give migrating children access to knowledge: To know that they can get health service, schooling and access to a place to play.

     

    “There are things that we can do to prevent migration,” Mark Pierce says. “The best things we are doing is to make sure that families and children are aware of the issues of migration; we are linking up families to government social safety net programmes to help them stay in their communities. But we have to acknowledge that migration does occur. So, what we are trying to do in this project is to try to make sure that migration – when it happens – is safe.”

     

     

    Learn more about the Save the Children programme: savethechildren.net/i-play-i-learn-and-im-safe

     

    Learn more about the IKEA Foundation campaign: ikeafoundation.org/campaigns/

    See more

    Bangladesh, 2017

    Save the Children

    1:30 video
    Interview filmed in Dhaka.